Thursday, 25 October 2007

Does African Man Love Himself?

By Hakeem Babalola

Being in a deep study of the African man would expose him. It seems he hates himself. No, he does not hate himself but he does not want to be himself. He likes to copy other types of men. He has completely forgotten that the only way for him to command respect is to be himself; to find a course of plan suitable for him and his environment.

When a man voluntarily throws away his culture, language, religion, and ways of thinking, he is actually burying himself in a fad that will likely hound him to his grave. When a man surreptitiously believes the aggressive propaganda of other men that labels him a third class fellow, then he is implicitly placing his children’s children in a sky-high tomb.

One of the worst thing that could happen to a man is to watch other men rape his daughter or mother or wife or sister. When that happens and such a man laughs it off, then he has only cowardly postponed the date of his death. And then he dies every day afterwards. When he is on his knees begging those who have stolen his properties and raped his mother, he is invariably saying I am unworthy and I am at your mercy.

The African man likes building castle in the air. He derives pleasure in building a house without foundation. He enjoys being treated with excessive indulgence, making him believe the world has been invented for his entertainment. He naively believes others while he passionately mistrusts himself. He is ever ready to follow other men’s perspective of life at the expense of his own.

Other men have been using their low but beguiling voices into making the African man abandon his self. After the partition, his religion, language, lifestyle, and even ways of thinking were taken from him. When other men told him that his religion was evil, he echoed evil and abandoned it. They accused him of being too masculine and he accepted femininity. He has blasphemed his own religion and now the gods are angry with him.

Where and who should he run to? He is confused. And he does not know himself anymore. He could neither go forward nor backward. He is stagnant. So he is ready to accept anything including femininity as defined by other men. See what they have turned the African man to. They have inspired and helped him split on himself. Hum, their enslavement has always been a solace to him like a prayer.

Is the African man cheating himself? Because he often collaborates with his deceiver to steal from himself. He goes all about using Africa’s name in vain. Sometimes he hides under cultural promotion and, or helping African poor children whereas he’s only satisfying his inordinate ambition and that of his deceiver. And he does this with impunity and deadly ignorance. When will he come to his senses? When will he know that every step he takes in this direction annihilates his type; even himself?

Most of the time, the African man thinks he is very smart and thus helps other men to mock his roots. He shows them the smooth and blistering pace to go about it. He provides them with the necessary logistics in order to increase the suffering of Africa. The African man is ready to sell his brother and sister for mere porridge. And then he complains of not making any progress!

When African man shuns the curable leaf in his garden and pays a fortune for other men’s leaf, he is willingly saying his own medicine or herb is quite inferior. When he siphons his people’s money to other land, he is telling the whole world that he is a perfect idiot. When he traffics his own people to other land for money, he is saying that he is as useless as those he traffics. But he is too greedy and violently involved to understand.

What should he do? Let him sit himself down. He needs to meditate. He needs to look in retrospect and highlights where things have gone wrong. He must go back to his own gods and repent. He must resist the temptation of serving other gods. The African man must start afresh. Let him teach his offspring the culture, language, religion and social life of his ancestors.

For African man to live in this new world order, he must believe in himself. He must design a way of life suitable for his type. For instance, if democrazy is being practiced in other land, he may want to find the system that best describe him and his environment. Even if other men are going forward, he may want to go backward. The point is not to be like them since he can never. This is the only way other men would respect him. Let him endeavour to think independently.

It is also important for him to know that he would remain the scorn of other men if he continues to borrow money or asks for favour of any kind. Let the African man go back to his roots. Let him read his history. Let him discover Kwame Nkrumah. Let him listen to Bob Marley and Fela Anikulapo-Kuti. Let him want to be.

African man needs penitential through arduous journey to holy places to seek forgiveness for his sins, and he should not do it by proxy. Let him go on a journey barefoot. He is to pray, fast, and to give alms to the needy. Most especially he must remain chaste during this peregrination. This isn’t a punishment in a way since confession plays a more important part in people’s spiritual lives, as they turn inward to assess the state of their souls.

It can also serve as a luminous experience, which takes him to the margin of a new reality. When he comes back he shall be on a higher level. As he goes along, he must take pen and paper. He must write in capital letters, and swear before gods:

HENCEFORTH, I SHALL STOP DECEIVING MESELF. FROM NOW ON I SHALL STOP COPYING OTHER MEN. NOW I KNOW ONLY MESELF CAN BUILD AFRICA. NO OTHER MAN WILL BUILD IT FOR ME. TIME TO BE. TO BEEEEEEEEE.

Author’s note: The african man in this article is a parody of African leaders with the exception of Nelson Mandela, Julius Nyerere and a few others. Come to think of it, why should Africans need visa to go to other African countries?

Copyright 2007 - mysmallvoice@yahoo.com

1 comment:

SLB, Ajala Trafu and Khalilurrahman said...

Shoko Loko Bangoshe said...

The article suggests that the African's problem can be solved if he "goes back to his roots". I suspect that the author makes this position, because by going back to his roots, the African will be able to establish a unique identity that will give him pride on the world stage.

However, I don't see anything wrong in the African borrowing ideas and practices from other cultures if they will help him maintain his economic independence. In fact, I doubt if the ideas that the African had centuries ago will be useful in a world that has radically changed since. And really, if the African borrows ideas and practices from an eclectic range of cultures and combines them together, he is actually creating a unique culture from the fusion of all these ideas and practices - one that also has the added benefit of helping him in his quest for economic independence.

08 November 2007 12:55
Ajala Trafu said...

"And really, if the African borrows ideas and practices from an eclectic range of cultures and combines them together, he is actually creating a unique culture from the fusion …….".



Shoko Loko Bangoshe
Sir, I think he is actually creating a unique type of cul-fusion or is it confusion?:idea:
To buttress this, I realise that the more cultures I mix with and learn the language to the point of comprehension and writing, the greater the war when I need to draft a simple document in English, vous comprenez? This I believe is the same when it comes to cultures. Nigeria is a conglomerate of cultures which it is obvious we have not been able to blend. A lot of our children live abroad for a long period of time, they come back bringing other cultures to add to the state of confusion, sorry cul-fusion, we already have.

The British and the French for instance, indoctrinate their citizens into their particular cultures from tender ages. It doesn’t matter where they later go, they remain who they are. Nigeria has not been this fortunate considering the cul-fusion the British left us with in merging diverse ‘sovereign entities’ together. We probably should have reasoned together then and opted for the country to be indoctrinated into one of the three major cultures. We could choose to all become Biafra Republic or Arewa Sharia Land better still Odua Peoples’ Republic.

I hope it is not too late to be delivered from confusion and have a real cul-fusion.

Ciao

08 November 2007 12:57
Khalilurrahman said...

However, I don't see anything wrong in the African borrowing ideas and practices from other cultures if they will help him maintain his economic independence. In fact, I doubt if the ideas that the African had centuries ago will be useful in a world that has radically changed since. And really, if the African borrows ideas and practices from an eclectic range of cultures and combines them together, he is actually creating a unique culture from the fusion of all these ideas and practices - one that also has the added benefit of helping him in his quest for economic independence.



Shoko, Ajala trafu

The bold part of the quote above refers to the reality we've been trying to drum about in the ears of the so-called Africanists who think the best for the continent is to go back to the ancient times and get its identity, spiritually socially and politically, in its pure and unadulterated form. The question here is how ancient? One millennium back when already something like Islam and Christianity was with us or when? Even if there is such a past that we can refer to how original to African any world view could ever have been because then the rules of immigration where not demarcated as they are now and the question of race and ethnicity was never an issue in constructing spiritual, political and social identities.

The rest of the quote refers to the reality among culturalists in both anthropology and what later became social anthropology that all cultures borrowed and are borrowing at whatever level. The West borrowed Christianity among other finer rules of etiquette and knowledge, from Middle-East to use them as platform for spiritual unity and political identity and it payed it well. The Turks and the Indians of the Mughal Empire borrowed Islam and other things from the Middle-East too and it paid them well.

Here in African the high point of our history in the times of the Ghana, Shongai and Mali empires were with a so-called borrowed religion from the Middle East.

It is my conviction that it is not when we discard everything some among us regard as foreign, from ideas to practice, that we as Africans or Africa as a political unit can develop to a greater height. It is the way of the world, Isaac Newton said he was not a genius when asked, but rather confessed to the truth that he only was clever enough to stand on the shoulders of the geniuses and as such he was seen to be most manifest than the rest of US the remains of African geniuses.

Khalilurrahman

08 November 2007 13:00